Dlighidh gabha gúal.

Dlighidh gabha gúal.

(deserves * smith * coal)

A smith is entitled to coal.

In Old Irish spelling, this would be "Dligid gobae gúal". Compare "Dligid óc eladain" in this collection. This maxim is found in the first poem in the Bodleain MS Laud 615, which is available on line, and which was the subject of discussion on Old-Irish-L (March/April 2005). Its companion maxim in the same poem is "Dlighidh coire cnáimh " (A cauldron deserves a bone), also in this collection. The specific meaning of this saying is that a blacksmith is (legally?) entitled to not just a fee for his work, but to the raw materials that go into it: iron and coal. The more general import seems to be that anyone who provides a valuable service is entitled to full and generous recompense for his work.